Butterbox Canyon and climb out

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Bayjam
Posts: 14
Joined: 22 May 2018, 16:08
Full name: Chris Tague
City: BIMBIMBIE
State: New South Wales

Butterbox Canyon and climb out

Post by Bayjam » 11 Jun 2018, 22:14


Some video footage of Butterbox a few weeks ago. Ripper of a canyon and the climb out... Well that's a story in itself



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T2
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Joined: 15 May 2018, 10:33
Full name: Tim Vollmer
City: Blaxland
State: New South Wales
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Re: Butterbox Canyon and climb out

Post by T2 » 13 Jun 2018, 11:03

Chris, great to see people still getting through wet canyons well into autumn! Butterbox / Mt Hay Canyon is a real classic.

I do want to just mention a point to think about (not just for you, but also others watching the video) regarding interactions with wild animals in the bush. Firstly, it is recommended that you don't handle yabbies / freshwater crayfish. This is because the females carry their fertilised eggs around for a month or more before they hatch, and the stress of being picked up (to them we are seen as predators) can result in them dropping their eggs. Given only about 1 per cent of baby yabbies make it to adulthood, this means you can accidentally wipe out an entire generation. So enjoy them and take plenty of pictures, but please don't pick them up. Likewise, feeding native animals can be really harmful to them. It isn't just that they are eating foods that are foreign to them, but they can become dependent on people.

The amazing array of plants and animals we come across in canyons is definitely part of what makes our passion so enjoyable, but we all need to make sure we interact with them in a safe, ethical, sustainable way to ensure our actions don't negatively impact these sensitive environments.

Flynny
Posts: 42
Joined: 22 May 2018, 16:10
Full name: Craig Flynn
City: The 'Go
State: New South Wales

Re: Butterbox Canyon and climb out

Post by Flynny » 14 Dec 2018, 15:12

T2 wrote:
13 Jun 2018, 11:03
Firstly, it is recommended that you don't handle yabbies / freshwater crayfish. This is because the females carry their fertilised eggs around for a month or more before they hatch, and the stress of being picked up (to them we are seen as predators) can result in them dropping their eggs.
Tim, I've seen this opinion shared a few times but I'm not sure how accurate it is.
The latest study I found is from 2010 sampling "Two high trafficked" canyons (Claustral and Grand, where groups picking up yabbie would be reasonably common through the warmer months) and two low "trafficked" canyons (Dalpura and Nayook, I'm assuming not the Deep Pass section). It found "Analysis of variance showed that none of the three parameters measured (animal abundance, length, or weight) differed significantly between canyons receiving high or low traffic"
They also analysed Grand in Autumn and Spring and found little to no difference. You'd assume if they were so susceptible to handling you'd see declines in Autumn from all the summer visitation of us yahoos that pick them up.

https://academic.oup.com/jcb/article-pd ... cb0770.pdf


Australian aquatic biological also found crayfish to be abundant in sububran steams in the blue mtn. If Blue mountains kids are anything like I was they'd be catching yabbies in those creeks all the time. The yabbie population was healthy even in Jamison creek just 12months after a bifenthrin spill in 2010 that all but whipped them out, so I think they are fairly robust and hardy.
There are plenty of photos on the AABIO website with them handling berried females, even unfurling their tails to show the berries.

For me interacting with nature is a great way to spread the passion

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